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Salomon van Ruisdael

Biographies
Salomon van Ruisdael

*  1600 Naarden
† 1670 Haarlem


Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael), one of the most important Dutch baroque landscape painters and uncle, presumably also teacher, of Jacob van Ruisdael, was born at Naarden (Northern Holland) between 1600 and 1603. Around 1616 Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) was attracted by the prospering art metropolis Haarlem, where he was presumably active in the studio of Esaias van de Velde.
In 1623 Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) was accepted into the Haarlem Gild of St. Luke. He became established as landscape painter and it seems that he also became a prominent figure in the city: Documents show that Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) was commissioner of the gild (1647-1669) and dean (1648), as well as district mayor (1659-1666).
The first independent paintings by Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) are dated 1626 and show the influence of Esaias van de Velde. At a later point the landscape style of Jan van Goyen gained influence: Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) also preferred low horizons and diagonal structure for the composition, as well as an earthen overall conception. His coloring became richer in contrast as of the late 1630s. His favorite motifs were canal views, dunes and beach scenes as well as flat landscapes with trees, often with animals or figurative staffage. As of the mid 1640s the silvery shimmering river views were among his masterpieces. In terms of mode, landscapes by Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael) remain clear and calm, merely his later period of creation showed a tendency towards a more dramatic and emotional landscape art. Domestic landscapes remained his favorite subject throughout his life, expect for just a few later sill lives.
Salomon van Ruisdael (Salomon van Ruysdael), who left behind a comprehensive oeuvre, found his last home in Haarlem in 1670.